© 2022 - NPEC

This spring, NPEC will offer a six-lecture virtual fellowship on the fundamentals of civil and military space policy followed by an additional round table policy discussion and a space war game. The nation’s leading space policy practitioners and experts will teach the course.

The course will offer:

  1. A brief history of space exploration and an overview of current and planned space programs;
  2. An analysis of the debates over alternative proposed military and civil space strategies;
  3. An overview of existing and planned U.S. and allied military space programs and what challenges they face from Russia, China, and other countries;
  4. An assessment of the military and commercial benefits and costs of the most significant civil and commercial efforts now being proposed;
  5. A brief history of space diplomacy, the current issues and players, and most important proposed space control ideas; and
  6. An assessment of China’s space programs.

These lectures and a policy round table session will be followed by a war game that will play out what might emerge from a credible North Korea threat to detonate a nuclear weapon in low-Earth orbit.

Schedule

  • April 28: Course Kick-off
  • April 29: Why and How We Went Into Orbit
  • May 6: What Do You Do After You Go to the Moon? 
  • May 13: America’s Military Space Force: What Is It and What It’s Up Against 
  • May 20: How We All Might Get Rich: Alternative Civil and Commercial Space Futures 
  • May 27: Statecraft and Spacecraft: The History and Future of Space Diplomacy 
  • June 3: China: Why Its Space Programs Matter 
  • June 27, 29, 30: Space Wargame

Lecturers

Kevin O’Connell (course kick-off) is a recognized expert on space commerce, the global space economy, international intelligence and U.S. national security matters. For almost four decades, he has focused on space commercialization and technological competitiveness and how to advance them in global markets. He has also focused on how these innovations impact U.S. and allied national security. His U.S. government assignments include the Department of Commerce (SES), The Department of Defense, The Department of State, The National Security Council, The Office of the Vice President, and The Office of the Director of Central Intelligence.

Scott Pace (lectures 1 and 2) is the former chief of staff of the President’s Space Council. Dr. Pace, who worked at RAND and as a NASA administrator, currently runs the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University. He is well-known as one of the nation’s top space policy analysts and administrators.

Mark Berkowitz (lecture 3) is a Vice President for Strategic Planning at Lockheed Martin Space responsible for thought leadership, strategy formulation, and strategic planning. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin in 2003, Mr. Berkowitz served as a career senior executive in the Office of the Secretary of Defense responsible for the analysis, formulation, and oversight of U.S. and Department of Defense policy guidance for the conduct of space activities.  He previously worked at the Department of State, the Congressional Research Service, SRI International, the National Institute for Public Policy, and National Security Research, Inc.  Since leaving the federal service, he has also been a consultant to DoD and the Intelligence Community.

Peter Hays (lecture 3)  is a Senior Space Policy Analyst at U.S. Department of Defense. Peter has been helping develop and implement all major national security space policy and strategy initiatives since 2004 and serves as a senior advisor on policy, strategy, governance, and strategic messaging issues. Dr. Hays was presented the National Intelligence Professional Award by the Director of National Intelligence in 2014.

Jeffrey Becker (lecture 4) is a future consultant for the U.S. military. He previously served the U.S. Joint Forces Command’s Joint Futures Group where he researched and helped write three editions of the Joint Operating Environment, which addresses changes in the geopolitical and military landscape that will confront future joint force commanders. He has written extensively about the overlap between civil, commercial, and military space.

Peter Garretson (lecture 4) served as a strategy and policy advisor for the Chief of Staff of the Air Force, as Division Chief of Irregular Warfare Strategy Plans and Policy, and as the Chief of the Future Technology Branch of Air Force Strategic Planning. As an instructor of Joint Warfare at Air University, he initiated the Schriever Scholars and the Space Horizons Task Force (America’s think tank for space). He also was the first U.S. officer to serve at India’s premier strategic think tank, the Institute for Defense Studies and Analysis (IDSA), and was the designer of several Joint and interagency, airpower, and space power war games, including the Air Force Future Wargame Series (2005-2009) and the first-ever U.S.-UK-France Trilateral strategic wargame. He has written extensively about the future of space commerce.

Henry R. Hertzfeld (lecture 5) has served as a Senior Economist and Policy Analyst at both NASA and the National Science Foundation, and has been a consultant to many U.S. and international organizations, including a recent project on space applications with the OECD. He is the co-editor of Space Economics (AIAA 1992) and researched the privatization of the Space Shuttle, the economic benefits of NASA R&D expenditures, and the socioeconomic impacts of earth observation technologies.

Professor Jack Beard (lecture 5) is the Co-Director of the Space & Cyber Law Program at the University of Nebraska College of Law. Before coming to Nebraska, he was a member of the faculty at the UCLA School of Law. He previously served for 14 years as the Associate Deputy General Counsel (International Affairs) in the Office of the Secretary of Defense where he was responsible for a variety of legal matters related to arms control agreements, defense cooperation and basing agreements, programs assisting states of the former Soviet Union in dismantlement of weapons of mass destruction and other nonproliferation activities.  He was the senior lawyer on numerous U.S. delegations negotiating international agreements on a wide range of U.S. military operations and activities.

Namrata Goswami (lecture 6) won the prestigious MINERVA grant awarded by the Office of the U.S. Secretary of Defense (OSD) to study great power competition and is currently working on a book project (2020-2021) on “China’s Grand Strategy and the Notion of Territoriality and Resources.”

Kevin Pollpeter (lecture 6) is a research scientist in the CNA China Studies Division. He is an internationally recognized expert on China’s space program and is widely published on Chinese national security issues, focusing on Chinese military modernization, China’s defense industry, and Chinese views on information warfare.

This spring, NPEC will offer a six-lecture virtual fellowship on the fundamentals of civil and military space policy followed by an additional round table policy discussion and a space war game. The nation’s leading space policy practitioners and experts will teach the course.

The course will offer:

  1. A brief history of space exploration and an overview of current and planned space programs;
  2. An analysis of the debates over alternative proposed military and civil space strategies;
  3. An overview of existing and planned U.S. and allied military space programs and what challenges they face from Russia, China, and other countries;
  4. An assessment of the military and commercial benefits and costs of the most significant civil and commercial efforts now being proposed;
  5. A brief history of space diplomacy, the current issues and players, and most important proposed space control ideas; and
  6. An assessment of China’s space programs.

These lectures and a policy round table session will be followed by a war game that will play out what might emerge from a credible North Korea threat to detonate a nuclear weapon in low-Earth orbit.

Schedule

  • April 28: Course Kick-off 
  • April 29: Why and How We Went Into Orbit
  • May 6: What Do You Do After You Go to the Moon? 
  • May 13: America’s Military Space Force: What Is It and What It’s Up Against 
  • May 20: How We All Might Get Rich: Alternative Civil and Commercial Space Futures 
  • May 27: Statecraft and Spacecraft: The History and Future of Space Diplomacy 
  • June 3: China: Why Its Space Programs Matter 
  • June 10: Roundtable Discussion
  • June 27, 29, 30: Space Wargame

Lecturers

Kevin O’Connell (course kick-off) is a recognized expert on space commerce, the global space economy, international intelligence and U.S. national security matters. For almost four decades, he has focused on space commercialization and technological competitiveness and how to advance them in global markets. He has also focused on how these innovations impact U.S. and allied national security. His U.S. government assignments include the Department of Commerce (SES), The Department of Defense, The Department of State, The National Security Council, The Office of the Vice President, and The Office of the Director of Central Intelligence.

Scott Pace (lectures 1 and 2) is the former chief of staff of the President’s Space Council. Dr. Pace, who worked at RAND and as a NASA administrator, currently runs the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University. He is well-known as one of the nation’s top space policy analysts and administrators.

Mark Berkowitz (lecture 3) is a Vice President for Strategic Planning at Lockheed Martin Space responsible for thought leadership, strategy formulation, and strategic planning. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin in 2003, Mr. Berkowitz served as a career senior executive in the Office of the Secretary of Defense responsible for the analysis, formulation, and oversight of U.S. and Department of Defense policy guidance for the conduct of space activities.  He previously worked at the Department of State, the Congressional Research Service, SRI International, the National Institute for Public Policy, and National Security Research, Inc.  Since leaving the federal service, he has also been a consultant to DoD and the Intelligence Community.

Peter Hays (lecture 3)  is a Senior Space Policy Analyst at U.S. Department of Defense. Peter has been helping develop and implement all major national security space policy and strategy initiatives since 2004 and serves as a senior advisor on policy, strategy, governance, and strategic messaging issues. Dr. Hays was presented the National Intelligence Professional Award by the Director of National Intelligence in 2014.

Jeffrey Becker (lecture 4) is a future consultant for the U.S. military. He previously served the U.S. Joint Forces Command’s Joint Futures Group where he researched and helped write three editions of the Joint Operating Environment, which addresses changes in the geopolitical and military landscape that will confront future joint force commanders. He has written extensively about the overlap between civil, commercial, and military space.

Peter Garretson (lecture 4) served as a strategy and policy advisor for the Chief of Staff of the Air Force, as Division Chief of Irregular Warfare Strategy Plans and Policy, and as the Chief of the Future Technology Branch of Air Force Strategic Planning. As an instructor of Joint Warfare at Air University, he initiated the Schriever Scholars and the Space Horizons Task Force (America’s think tank for space). He also was the first U.S. officer to serve at India’s premier strategic think tank, the Institute for Defense Studies and Analysis (IDSA), and was the designer of several Joint and interagency, airpower, and space power war games, including the Air Force Future Wargame Series (2005-2009) and the first-ever U.S.-UK-France Trilateral strategic wargame. He has written extensively about the future of space commerce.

Henry R. Hertzfeld (lecture 5) has served as a Senior Economist and Policy Analyst at both NASA and the National Science Foundation, and has been a consultant to many U.S. and international organizations, including a recent project on space applications with the OECD. He is the co-editor of Space Economics (AIAA 1992) and researched the privatization of the Space Shuttle, the economic benefits of NASA R&D expenditures, and the socioeconomic impacts of earth observation technologies.

Professor Jack Beard (lecture 5) is the Co-Director of the Space & Cyber Law Program at the University of Nebraska College of Law. Before coming to Nebraska, he was a member of the faculty at the UCLA School of Law. He previously served for 14 years as the Associate Deputy General Counsel (International Affairs) in the Office of the Secretary of Defense where he was responsible for a variety of legal matters related to arms control agreements, defense cooperation and basing agreements, programs assisting states of the former Soviet Union in dismantlement of weapons of mass destruction and other nonproliferation activities.  He was the senior lawyer on numerous U.S. delegations negotiating international agreements on a wide range of U.S. military operations and activities.

Namrata Goswami (lecture 6) won the prestigious MINERVA grant awarded by the Office of the U.S. Secretary of Defense (OSD) to study great power competition and is currently working on a book project (2020-2021) on “China’s Grand Strategy and the Notion of Territoriality and Resources.”

Kevin Pollpeter (lecture 6) is a research scientist in the CNA China Studies Division. He is an internationally recognized expert on China’s space program and is widely published on Chinese national security issues, focusing on Chinese military modernization, China’s defense industry, and Chinese views on information warfare.